That sound stretches, expands and inhabits a space has always captivated me – from the subtle chamber and spring on Otis Redding’s voice at Stax records, the killer vocal slap on Springsteen’s Ain’t got you;¬†the ghostly church tones of Arcade Fire’s My body is a cage; the way it unfolds new vistas in Stina Nordenstam’s Little Star; to the tape Echomatic on Hank Marvin’s Apache. Reverb and delay impart time, space and texture – the sense this has happened, is happening, somewhere in a real or imagined world. We remember, we re-invent in the refracting of spaces.

The reprise of U2’s classic ‘All I want is you’ is one such re-imagining. In the final moments Edge’s guitar transmutes into an otherworldly, receding horizon – a conflation of ecstatic angels and grinning devils, of spinning and falling trapeze artists, of wonder and lost love. Brian Eno and Danial Lanois pioneered the use of AMS and Eventide harmoniser / pitch shift / delays, and reverb guru Sean Costello of Valhalla DSP gives a fine rundown of some of those techniques here.

Shimmering reverb is a beautiful thing – but there have been times I’ve wished the shimmer to be more in tune, or more controlled within a track – for instance when mixing dense vocal harmonies in RnB, or dealing with sophisticated pop orchestrations‚Ķ So I recently discovered a new way to create Sshimmerverb using Celemony’s Melodyne software – and thanks to my gracious and outstandingly talented friend Emm Collins letting me use it on her demo, and the wonderful folk at Celemony, I’ve made a video that details the technique step by step. It takes a little bit of doing, but the results are quite unique. Check it out yourself in the link below…